The World's Largest Dinosaurs

current exhibition

The World's Largest Dinosaurs
at Prairiefire

Exhibition Details

The huge dinosaurs called sauropods astound us. So massive! So tall! Such long necks and tiny heads! But more astounding is this: these strange giants rank among Earth’s great success stories, roaming the planet for 140 million years. Today, scientists from many fields have joined in an effort to figure out how they did it. Paleontologists, biologists, botanists, animal nutritionists, and engineers all agree: the world’s largest dinosaurs were extraordinary creatures. The challenge is to discover why.

Organized by the American Museum of Natural History, The World’s Largest Dinosaurs is open February 11th through September 4th, 2017.

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Paleontologists, biologists, botanists, animal nutritionists, and engineers all agree: the world’s largest dinosaurs were extraordinary creatures.

-AMNH

The World's Largest Dinosaurs

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About The Exhibit

Size + Scale

Size is much more than just a matter of appearances. It affects nearly everything an animal does. Big animals eat more than small animals; small animals breathe faster than big animals. Big animals generally live much longer than small ones.

Mamenchisaurus

The centerpiece of our exhibition is Mamenchisaurus hochuanensis (Mah-MEN-chi-SAWR-us ho-CHOO-an EN-sis). As you explore the exhibition you’ll encounter her both as she looked in life and as she would have looked had scientists been able to peer inside her body.

Digging Up Sauropods

To figure out how sauropods moved, breathed or ate, paleontologists need fossils. For example, we know a great deal about Mamenchisaurus because of fossils uncovered in China. Fossil expeditions around the world have uncovered the remains of hundreds of sauropod species. Large numbers of sauropod fossils have been found in Wyoming, in the western U.S., at a site called Howe Quarry.

The Future

Have paleontologists already found the world’s largest dinosaur? Look at it this way. Sauropods reigned for 140 million years, and scientists have only been digging for about 150 years. Is it likely they’ve already unearthed the very biggest? Note that since The World’s Largest Dinosaurs first premiered in New York scientists have discovered an even larger specimen: The Titanosaur.

 

education

Education Materials

Rotating semiannually, American Museum of Natural History traveling exhibitions will support the Next Generation Science Standards and the Common Core State Standards. Resources for our upcoming exhibition organized by the American Museum of Natural History, The World’s Largest Dinosaurs, as well as information on field trips, are available.

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Exhibition